• News/ Viral

    Lamborghini Huracan crashes at 200mph (VIDEO)

    Lamborghini Huracan crash

    Lamborghini Huracan supercar driver demonstrates why it’s not a good idea to do big speed on the public road in chilling viral crash video. 

    They say the only place where you can really safely stretch the legs of a high horsepower supercar is at a race track, drag strip or runway should you have the funds to hire an airport for the day… Yes, technically you could visit a country that doesn’t have speed limits on certain roads like Germany or Italy, but it’s still pretty sketchy doing over 200mph on a road shared with other cars, trucks and people. At 200mph the closing speed between you and a car that might want to pop out to the outside lane to overtake the dawdler doing 60mph is still a staggering 140mph. You’re almost covering 100 meters every second, the speed is incredible and most roads and drivers were not designed to deal with cars travelling at such a vast rate of knots.

    The video below is proof that even in a fancy new Lamborghini Huracan supercar with all-wheel drive, a double-clutch gearbox and carbon fibre chassis that happily power past 200mph, things can and do go wrong. The chilling video below shows the moments before the bright green Lambo was turned into a pile of metallic mush as its pilot pushed the car up to 330km/h (205mph) on Hungary’s M7 highway. The video ends when the car seems to strike some quite severe bumps in the road which cause it to lose grip and collide with some metal before the video ends and the aftermath images commence.

    Fortunately there were no fatalities in the accident, apart from the Huracan which was a total write off, though it’s believed the person filming from the passenger seat suffered serious injuries.

    Lesson: stay safe out there. You can check out the full video below.

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  • Reviews/ Super Cars

    First drive: The new Lamborghini Huracan is a next level supercar

    2015-lamborghini-huracan

    You slide into the low, bolstered seat, flip up the aircraft-style cover, press the start button, and hear the V-10 engine roar to life. Bump the steering wheel mode selector to Corsa, pull the right paddle, and off you go, down the pit lane at Ascari, ready to hit the track behind an Aventador. The Lamborghini Huracán is unleashed.

    This is a very good way to spend a Thursday.

    Or a Tuesday, a Sunday, or any other day for that matter. Not just because you’re at one of the finest private tracks in Europe, or because you’re well-heeled enough to be there, but because you’re behind the wheel of Lamborghini’s replacement for the Gallardo, the best car the company has ever built.

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    That’s quite a statement to make with automotive icons like the Countach, Diablo, and Miura in the stable. But it’s true. The Huracán is the best Lamborghini ever.

    It’s certainly a marked upgrade from the Aventador, though its sensuous exterior is somewhat more reserved; from ride comfort to shift quality to raw capability, the Huracán is, in nearly every quantitative and qualitative way, superior to its bigger brother.

    The Huracán is also a major improvement on the Gallardo—a car I never much cared for, dynamically. Sitting still, or rolling raucously up to its destination, the Gallardo managed to impress for most of its 10-year run, but the unrefined transmission, mediocre handling, and peaky, high-strung engine quickly showed weakness when pressed into true supercar service. Toward the end of its decade, it began to look a bit tired, too, a dozen special variants notwithstanding.

    But the Huracán has none of these foibles. In fact, the engineering team behind the Huracán set out rather explicitly to remove the Gallardo’s shortcomings, all the while wrapping it in an unmistakably, irresistibly Lamborghini shell. They succeeded.

     

    2015 Lamborghini Huracán first drive 

    The Track

    Let loose on the Ascari circuit for some group lead-follow action with a Lamborghini hot shoe at the wheel of an Aventador to set the pace, the Huracán initially feels like it’s wearing a straitjacket. That’s Strada mode, which has an insanely (but probably gladly) intrusive calibration for traction and stability control, preventing the application of full throttle with nearly any amount of steering angle dialed in. Fortunately, there are two other modes accessible via the toggle mounted at the six o’clock position on the steering wheel.

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    Bump it down into Sport mode and things liven up quite a bit–the throttle mapping gets snappier, the seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox gets quicker, the dynamic exhaust gets louder, and the stability control system lets loose its death grip–just a bit. You have the option of letting the gearbox handle shifts for you in Sport mode, or doing the work yourself via the fixed column-mounted paddle shifters. Still, a few turns in Sport mode and an experienced driver will find themselves wanting more control.

    The answer is Corsa mode. Reducing stability control to a minimum–it was so unintrusive when driven smoothly, we found no reason to object despite the Ascari circuit’s many tortuous and tricky turns, elevation changes, and hard braking zones. Shifting is manual-only in Corsa mode, adding further to the driver’s sense of control. Likewise, the gearbox, throttle, and damping are all sharpened to their most aggressive settings in Corsa, transforming the once mild-mannered Huracán into a car that’s serious fun on track.

     

    2015 Lamborghini Huracán first drive

    Dynamically, once in Corsa mode, the Huracán feels rather a lot like the Audi R8 V10 Plus. That’s certainly not a bad thing: there’s loads of power from the quick-revving 5.2-liter V-10 engine (601 hp, to be precise), and the 3,370-pound car is very well-balanced for a mid-engined, all-wheel-drive car. The tendency toward power-on understeer is notable, but a few laps of calibrating driving style to match the car’s grip and propulsion levels quickly makes it an easy car to drive scarily fast.

    Part of the credit for the Huracán’s good manners goes to the Lamborghini Piattaforma Inerziale, a set of accelerometers arranged in three axes. Many cars use three-axis calculations to provide yaw, roll, and pitch information to the stability control system–but Lamborghini takes it two steps further, installing two addition gyroscopes so each axis has a direct reading for the system to use. Other systems use a single gyroscope paired with accelerometers, requiring them to perform calculations to derive movements in the other two axes. Lamborghini’s new system in the Huracán enables far quicker and more precise readings to be delivered to the computers, resulting a stability control system that is noticeably better largely by being completely unnoticeable.

    2015 Lamborghini Huracán first drive

    The Huracán’s innate dynamic balance also makes good sense when you consider the Huracán’s aluminum-and-carbon chassis is now 10 percent lighter and 50 percent stiffer than the Gallardo’s. Drag is also reduced by 3 percent while downforce is up more than 50 percent, improving grip at speed and resulting in 8 percent greater efficiency. Add in the new electronically controlled center differential, a major upgrade from the viscous unit in the Gallardo which allows more precise distribution of torque to all four wheels, and the whole system comes together in an eminently competent whole.

    We can’t quite agree with Lamborghini’s assertions during the press briefing before the track session that the Huracán is “the perfect car,” or “the best car on track and the street,” but we can applaud Lamborghini for getting far closer to those ideals than with any other car we’ve driven from the brand–and closer than many other brands have ever come

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    There are just two items of concern for the Huracán on track: the brakes and the cooling. While the brakes never seemed to experience fade due to heat, they were prone to some odd and unpredictable behavior thanks to a computer algorithm designed to handle panic stops. If engaged due to a loss or reduction of traction at one wheel, or if the brake pedal is engaged too suddenly, the system causes the brake pedal to become excessively firm, and the lack of travel creates a momentary panic in the driver before the realization that the car is, in fact, still stopping just fine sets in.

    The second quibble–cooling–is an overall concern, as we had the Huracán enter an overheat “limp mode” behavior during the track session. When overheated, the Huracán limits engine revs to 6,000 rpm and takes over gear shifts to use the highest gear possible–clearly a damper for track-day fun. The circumstances of our journalist track day likely had a strong role in the overheating, however, with the cars being lapped repeatedly with minimal time to cool down on a warm day. An individual driving their own car at a track day would likely never experience the issue.

     

    2015 Lamborghini Huracán first drive

    The Street

    Having exorcised our speed demons, we headed out for a quick trip through the mountains to see how the Huracán performs in the real world, where 99.9% of these cars will see 99.999999% of their miles. Again, the most apt comparison is to the Audi R8 V10 Plus, and again, the comparison is a good thing. The Huracán is comfortable, quiet, and well-mannered.

    Even over very bumpy roads (a detour took us off-route and onto some roads to which no Lamborghini owner would willingly subject their prized steed), the Huracán’s composition and poise was unshaken. It’s a super sports car, to be sure, and the bumps are noticeable, but the magneto-rheological dampers make the ride smoother than it has any right to be.

    READ: Lamborghini Aventador Roadster Quick Drive: A $400,000 Pay Date Earns Its Fee

    In town, the Huracán’s width becomes very, very apparent. Passing traffic in the next lane can be a haunting experience, especially on a narrow Andalucian street, and doubly if that traffic consists of large trucks. The width also makes U-turns, parking, and all forms of low-speed maneuvering a bit trickier than in any normal machine–but that’s the price you pay for the Huracán’s wild performance, comfortable cabin, and hey-look-at-me styling.

    The price you’ll pay to own a Huracán in the U.S. starts at $237,250. That figure can rise as far as your budget will allow should you wish to engage the Ad Personam customization service for unique colors, materials, or other features.

     

    2015 Lamborghini Huracán first drive

    The Rockstar

    Something that neither the on-track abilities nor on-road manners of the Huracán can express is the instant rockstar status one obtains by simply being in–or near–the Huracán. People of all ages and genders will give you thumbs up. Some will follow you in their cars, shooting video with their phones and gesticulating madly. Many will assume you’re someone famous.

    In a way, you are: You drive a Huracán.

    Part of the Huracán’s magic is its design, a drop-dead gorgeous array of curves and acute angles that recalls something of the Countach’s sharp-nosed, high-tailed futuristic wedge shape, mingling it with the aerospace-era themes of the Reventón, and yet coming out the other side of the looking glass with a completely unique, fresh take on the inimitably Lamborghini way of shaping a car.

    Another part of the Huracán’s magic is the sound. Raucous and unrepentant, the nearly all-new V-10 engine barks, growls, screams, and moans with the best of the cylinder-driven symphony. It’s an experience not just for the driver or passenger, but for the tiny slice of the world that surrounds the Huracán as it flashes by.

    Rolled in with its dynamic ability and civic civility, the magnetism of the look and sound makes the Huracán not just one of our favorite cars, but the best Lamborghini we’ve ever driven.

     

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  • Super Cars

    Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours (PHOTOS)

    Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours

    Having only made its world debut at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show last week,Lamborghini’s new Huracán LP 610-4 has since made a surprise showing at the recent 2014 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. On hand for the car’s official North American debut was Lamborghini CEO Stephan Winkelmann who was able to meet with potential customers and tell them all about the latest raging bull from Sant’Agata Bolognese.

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    The U.S. in particular remains Lamborghini’s single biggest market so it’s no surprise that the Huracán has been shown on local soil so quickly after its world debut. Lamborghini has already been showing the car to private audiences around the globe and has managed to rack up more than 700 orders in just one month. A bulk of those orders, around 300 in fact, came from North American clients alone so it’s clear where most of the cars will be ending up.

    “Since we began private previews of the Huracán earlier this year, more than 300 units have been pre-ordered by North American clients,” Winkelmann said at the car’s Amelia Island debut. “The reception it received at the Amelia Island Concours this weekend matches that level of enthusiasm as well as the energy we saw from the global audience in Geneva.”

    As previously reported, the Huracán packs a mid-mounted 5.2-liter V-10 engine rated at 601 horsepower and 480 pound-feet of torque. The engine is mated to a new seven-speed dual-clutch transmission and advanced all-wheel-drive system. The 0-62 mph sprint is said to take just 3.2 seconds and top speed is said to be around 202 mph.

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    Thanks to extensive use of carbon fiber in the car’s construction, the Huracán is not only lighter than the Gallardo at 3,140 pounds but it’s also significantly more rigid. The car’s platform will be shared with the next-generation Audi R8, just as the current Gallardo and R8 are twins under the skin.

    Lamborghini will build the Huracán on a brand-new line at its plant in northern Italy, with the first cars reaching customers in the spring. Pricing will be announced closer to the official sales launch.

    Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island ConcoursLamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours Lamborghini Huracán Makes North American Debut At Amelia Island Concours
    via: Motor Authority

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  • Super Cars

    Lamborghini Huracán LP 610-4 Will Melt Your Mind (VIDEO)

    So, the Lamborghini Huracán LP 610-4 has been officially unveiled at Geneva, and it is one seriously sexy bit of kit; there’s no denying that.

    And now that this video has arisen, it only confirms that. Lamborhini have gone all out with this revealing video of the Huracán, seemingly rivaling the new Need for Speed movie. It’s a genuinely thrilling 3 minutes.

    Not to mention that this video has many shots to drool over, and have you begging for me.

    lam1lam2lam3lam4lam5lam6lam7

    Here’s the aforementioned video: prepare to have your mind blown.

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  • Super Cars

    The Lamborghini Huracán configurator is here for fill all your supercar fantasies

    lamborghini-huracn-lp-610-4-configurator

    The Lamborghini Huracán LP 610-4 is just days away from its debut at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show but the car has already been presented to potential customers where it managed to rack up 700 orders in just one month. Even if you have little chance of affording its six-figure pricetag, you can still pretend that you’re one of those potential buyers by loading up Lamborghini’s new online configurator for the Huracán.

    Lamborghini Huracán configurator

    Here, you can get all the vital stats as well as play around with the color options (pictured above is the Huracán in Verde Mantis). You can then choose a particular wheel pattern and the color of the brake calipers to finalize the car’s exterior look.

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    Then it’s time to move on to the interior where you can fiddle with items such as the color of the trim, the type of steering wheel and whether or not you want Lamborghini’s logo emblazoned on the seats.

    Once complete, if you are in the position to buy the Huracán, now would be the time to contact your local Lambo dealer and place your order. Given the popularity of the car thus far, wait times may be long.

    Future owners have a lot to look forward to, though, as the Huracán LP 610-4 comes with a 601-horsepower version of the 5.2-liter V-10 fitted to the outgoing Gallardo. In the Huracán, the engine is paired with a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission which Lamborghini calls a “Doppia Frizione”. The 0-62 mph sprint will take just 3.2 seconds and top speed is said to be around 202 mph.

    Full pricing and availability for the U.S. market will be announced later in the year.

    via Motor Authority

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  • Super Cars

    DMC teases 988hp Lamborghini Aventador Edizione GT

    DMC teases 988hp Aventador Edizione GT

    DMC teases 988hp Aventador Edizione GT

    If the standard 700hp Lambo Aventador doesn’t hit the spot. German tuners DMC luxury has an insane $290k solution.
    Before you guys get too excited, this is still just a concept from German Tuners DMC Luxury and these images are just renders, but it still a freaking beast.

    Just like Lamborghini, the ‘LP’ number refers to the horsepower. Which means that DMC is about to release an Aventador with nearly 1,000hp.

    While the official ‘teaser’ announcement is unwilling to confirm that 988hp figure, it links through to DMC’s Flickr page, where corroboration is plain to see. Exactly how the power increase has been achieved remains a mystery at this stage, but at least the output goes some way towards justifying Edizione GT’s appearance.

    The bodykit alone is set to cost an eye-watering $89,990  while the proposed engine work – whatever it is exactly – has been priced at $134,530

    That’s a grand total of $288,888 all in. – roughly what we’re expecting Lamborghini to charge for an entire Huracan, the recently announced replacement for the Gallardo.

    Wow!

    DMC teases 988hp Aventador Edizione GT

     

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  • Videos

    Watch The New Lamborghini Huracan Do Donuts! (VIDEO)

    In the final episode of the Hexagon Project, the awesome Lamborghini Huracan supercar does some smokey donuts!

    It’s the final episode of the Hexagon Project, a sort of series of teaser videos made by Lamborghini showing how a group of lads um, broke into their factory to find the new Huracan super car before it ever saw the light of day. They’re actors obviously, but it was an interesting way to tease the new model and create some hype.

    The fourth and final episode in the series shows how the guys uncover the car, then take it for a smokey joy ride around Lamborghini’s headquarters. It also gives us a proper listen to that amazing 610hp V10 engine… It sounds the business. 

    Now watch…

    You can read more about the Lamborghini Huracan here…

    Follow us on Twitter @CarhootsApp and ‘like’ us on Facebook!

     

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  • Super Cars

    Is This The First Official Picture Of The Lamborghini Huracan? (PHOTOS)

    Word is the Lamborghini Gallardo replacement has been leaked online…

    The above image of what is supposedly the Lamborghini Gallardo replacement has been swirling around the Interwebs today. We can’t confirm where the image originated, but some are suggesting that this is the real deal. We’re skeptical, as this is quite clearly a computer-generated image (look at the headlights and wheels), but car companies do sometimes share digital images. So who knows…

    The V10-powered Gallardo successor will likely make its public debut at the Geneva Motor Show in March.

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